Fireworks and showers

Fireworks are once again on sale in Hunt County, in time for the Memorial Day holiday. However, anyone wanting to use the devices will likely be dodging raindrops.

Fireworks are once again on sale in Hunt County, in time for the Memorial Day holiday.

However, anyone wanting to use the devices will likely be dodging raindrops to do so, as showers and thunderstorms and the potential for severe weather and flooding are in the forecast throughout the long weekend and into next week.

Sales began Wednesday at fireworks stands across the county and will continue through midnight on Memorial Day on Monday.

The Hunt County Commissioners Court passed a resolution in 2019, authorizing the annual sale of fireworks, by permit holders, to the public in celebration of Texas Independence Day, San Jacinto Day and Memorial Day.

A state law adopted in 2015, which went into effect in 2016, allows individual counties to decide whether to permit retail sales of fireworks, by permit holders, to the public in celebration of Texas Independence Day, March 2; San Jacinto Day, April 21; and Memorial Day, which falls on May 25 this year.

But it doesn’t mean everyone in the county will be able to legally shoot off fireworks.

The use of all fireworks is prohibited inside all of the incorporated cities in Hunt County, but they are allowed in the unincorporated areas. Violators can be cited to appear in court and face stiff fines for each offense.

Cloudy skies and chances for precipitation may dampen some of the fireworks enthusiasm.

The National Weather Service forecast was calling for showers and thunderstorms to begin today, with chances for additional rainfall Friday and Saturday.

The chances for storms is expected to increase Sunday and continue through at least Tuesday of next week.

Any significant rainfall could lead to floods or flash floods, as the ground across Hunt County remains well saturated, according to the Keetch-Byram Drought Index, or KBDI, which monitors soil moisture levels and is an indicator used to determine the threat of fire danger.

A reading of “zero” under the index means the soil is saturated, while 800 is the highest reading on the index, indicating it would take eight or more inches of rainfall to bring the soil to saturation.

As of Wednesday morning, Hunt County recorded readings of 57 to 208, with a countywide average of 97.

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