Council plans public hearings

The Greenville City Council is scheduled to conduct public hearings Tuesday before voting to approve the proposed city budget and property tax rate, although there may still be time for doing some tweaking the final numbers on the project.

The Greenville City Council is scheduled to conduct public hearings Tuesday before voting to approve the proposed city budget and property tax rate, although there may still be time for doing some tweaking the final numbers on the project.

The council intends to review the budget once more  under Tuesday’s work session starting at 5 p.m., with the public hearings and votes planned during the regular session beginning at 6 p.m. in the Fletcher Warren Civic Center 5501 Highway 69 South.

• City Manager Summer Spurlock had proposed a budget which includes a decrease in the city’s property tax rate and a pay increase for city employees.

Spurlock initially recommended a property tax rate of 61.20 cents per $100 valuation, three-tenths of a cent below the current rate of 61.50 cents. The city’s property tax rate one year earlier was 64.22 cents per $100 valuation.

The budget included a 4% merit pay increase for city employees, who did not receive an increase in pay during the current year.

Spurlock has also offered options for the budget during Tuesday’s council work session.

Option 1 would lower the proposed property tax rate to 59 cents per $100 valuation, which would require the elimination of a planned new police department command post vehicle as well as upgrades to Oak Creek Park. Option 2 would maintain the proposed tax rate, but would raise the merit pay increase to 5% by removing a special event from the recreation fund along with a planned restroom remodel. Option 3 would lower the property tax rate to 59 cents and include the pay increase, while removing the command post, Oak Creek Park upgrades, the special event funding and the restroom remodel.

The council has also Spurlock draft a proposal where the tax rate would be at or around 59 cents, without eliminating the improvement items and with the higher pay raise, but using a larger portion of the city’s fund balance.

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