Water treatment, supply

The current and anticipated growth in the City of Greenville is putting a strain on the city’s water treatment and supply processes.

The current and anticipated growth in the City of Greenville is putting a strain on the city’s water treatment and supply processes.

Tonight, the Greenville City Council intends to take steps to purchase new water meters, approve a major upgrade for the Water Treatment Plant and also to begin the process of expand the Wastewater Treatment Plant.

All three of the items are scheduled to be considered during the regular session beginning at 6 p.m. in the Fletcher Warren Civic Center 5501 Highway 69 South. A work session is also scheduled starting at 5:30 p.m.

• In a memo to the council, Public Works Director Press Tompkins noted a new fee schedule went into effect with the start of the fiscal year on Oct. 1, 2020/

“The approved fee schedule included a line item for the cost of water meters including meters and boxes of various sizes to be paid to the City at the time of meter request,” Tompkins said, adding the monies were to be deposited into a revenue account to purchase water meters and boxes.

“With the influx of several neighborhoods set to be built soon, there is a need to purchase water meters and boxes in advance,” Tompkins said. By ordering these meters and boxes it will eliminate a potential delay in the installation of water meters thereby assuring quicker and smoother installation process.”

Tompkins is recommending the council approve the remaining $236,650 in the fund to buy various sizes of meters and boxes to be installed.

• Tompkins also explained there is a need for a \replacement of the existing process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system in the Water Treatment Plant.

Tompkins said the Water Treatment Plant process control system, constructed in 1993, and SCADA system constructed in 1998, are composed of many elements that are now obsolete, outdated and generally in poor condition.

The problem is causing an impediment to provide safe and reliable water supply to local residents.

Tompkins is recommending the city award a contract valued at $596,150 to Signature Automation for the “in-kind” replacement of the existing process control and SCADA system.

• Tompkins is also recommending the council authorize a Professional Service Agreement with Hanson Professional Services, Inc., to evaluate the capacity of the city’s Wastewater Treatment Plant and five sanitary lift stations, as the existing plant is nearing capacity.

“The Wastewater Treatment Plant’s current system is slated for aggressive growth in population in the near future which would place the Wastewater Treatment Plant above the 75% capacity level,” Tompkins said. “In addition, many of the City’s sanitary lift stations are operating at 90% capacity and are in need of upgrades.”

Tompkins said the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality requires the city start the process for the expansion of the Wastewater Treatment Plant at the 75% capacity level, adding Hanson Professional Services, Inc., proposes to provide Engineering planning services for the future expansion of the Wastewater Treatment Plant at a cost not to exceed $121,000.

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