Donating bulletproof vests

One local church may be a little safer in the future, as it will receive a donation of bulletproof vests from the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office.

One local church may be a little safer in the future, as it will receive a donation of bulletproof vests from the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office.

The Hunt County Commissioners Court is expected next week to approve the contribution, and to also sign off on an agreement with the district which handles 911 calls across a wide area of North Texas.

Both items are included under a lengthy agenda for Tuesday’s regular meeting, scheduled for 10 a.m. in the Auxiliary Courtroom at 2700 Johnson Street in Greenville.

The donation of two bulletproof vests will be taken from the sheriff’s inventory to Highland Terrace Baptist Church at the request of Sheriff Randy Meeks.

Meeks could not immediately be reached Thursday for comment as to why he was making the donation, or as to who the vests would be designated to protect.

The donation is listed as part of the consent calendar for the meeting, which refers to items considered routine by the Commissioner’s Court that will be enacted by one motion.

Under the action items for the meeting, the commissioners are scheduled to vote on approving an inter-local agreement between Hunt County and the North Central Texas Emergency Communications District for Regional 9-1-1 Service.

In February the commissioners appointed Hunt County Justice of the Peace Precinct 2 Kerry Crews to the district’s board of directors.

The commissioners court and the Greenville City Council both voted in April 2016 to approve resolutions authorizing the creation of the district through the North Central Texas Council of Governments.

The move was designed to make sure all of the money collected for 911 services stays in the district, and to allow for more local control of the 911 program.

During the 2015 legislative session, the Texas Health and Safety Code was amended to permit Council of Governments/Regional Planning Commissions to establish Regional Emergency Communications Districts, to allow for the creation of a board and a governing body on a local level within the council of governments.

Texans are charged 50 cents on each month’s phone bills to pay for 9-1-1 services. The money is sent to the state until such time as the Texas Legislature appropriates all or part of the funds collected to the Texas Commission on State Emergency Communications, which then allocates the funds to councils of governments.

The NCTCOG will continue to staff the new district and there would be no disruption or change in the current services provided by the 911 centers.