The Herald Banner, Greenville, TX

March 17, 2013

Huge planned development getting started

By BRAD KELLAR
Herald-Banner Staff

GREENVILLE — A board of directors which will be overseeing the installation of infrastructure for a massive development planned for just west of Greenville, will be meeting for the first time this week.

The board of the Hunt County Municipal Utility District No. 1 is scheduled for an organizational session, which will be open to the public, at 1 p.m. Tuesday at 3401 Private 1173, which is north of U.S. Highway 380 about halfway between Greenville and Farmersville.

 The district has also been referred to as the Walton Development Municipal Utility District (MUD), and is an approximately 6,635 acre tract of land, located partially with the extraterritorial jurisdiction of the city of Greenville.

The district is expected to consist of industrial manufacturing and distribution facilities, single family residential and some commercial development.

The board is scheduled Tuesday to hear a report from the developer, elect officers, adopt a resolution designating a location within the district to post notices of meetings, designate an administrative office and meeting places inside and outside of the district and consider approving a developer reimbursement agreement.

Last summer, the City of Greenville announced it was planning to provide the water and sewer service to the district, which eventually will cover an area of almost 13,000 acres, generally bounded by FM 1080 to the north, County Road 1073 to the east, FM 3211 to the south and FM 36 to the west.

The City of Greenville would extend its extra-territorial jurisdiction (ETJ) to eventually include the entire MUD, which would give the city the authority to establish zoning standards for the entire district.

A strategic partnership agreement would allow the city to collect sales taxes from within the MUD and earn additional revenue from the sale of water and sewer services as the area develops, while allowing for the application of the city’s subdivision standards and land use regulations to help govern the development within the district.

The district might someday develop into a small city itself with more than 21,000 units of housing proposed.

MUDs are one way developers can use to help pay for the establishment of infrastructure such as roads as well as water and sewer lines, with bonds sold to pay off the debt incurred through the establishment of an ad valorem tax rate within the district.

The Texas Legislature passed bills creating the Hunt County Municipal Utility District No. 1 in 2011 and voters within the district approved its creation in November of that year.