The Herald Banner, Greenville, TX

April 28, 2013

Lots of choices going before local voters

By BRAD KELLAR
Herald-Banner Staff

GREENVILLE — Voters in Greenville are being asked in the upcoming election to consider whether to approve dozens of changes to the city’s governing document.

A total of 30 proposed amendments to the City of Greenville Charter are included on the May 11 election ballot.

Nine of the propositions deal with the word “simple”, in terms of a defining and implementing “simple majority” votes, while 12 of the proposed changes deal with the city’s relationship with its employees — including the city manager and city attorney — including how they can be hired and/or fired.

Early voting for the May 11 election begins Monday and continues through May 7, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays at the Hunt County Voter Administration Office, 2217A Washington Street in Greenville.

Extended early voting for the election is scheduled 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

Propositions 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 involve City Council appointees; which include the city manager, city secretary, city attorney and municipal judge.

Among the proposed changes is the addition of a new section, “General Definitions” to the Charter, which would specify that in terms of voting, a majority of the Council would be four out of the seven members, a “simple majority” would mean one more than half of the Council members present during a meeting and a “super majority” would be five of seven Council members.

Propositions 15, 17, 20, 21, 23, 24, 26, 27 and 30 involve the terms as to how a “simple majority” vote would be implemented, if the propositions are approved by voters.

Other propositions on the ballot would correct typographical errors and misspellings, extend the period under which citizens can file for a referendum vote from 30 days to six months after the passage of an ordinance and allow members of the GEUS board to live outside of the city limits of Greenville.

State law allows the charter to be amended every two years and to also reflect changes in state law if needed. During an election in May 2010, Greenville’s registered voters passed all 13 proposed amendments on the ballot.